riverkilling

India is at crossroads, Indian environmental landscape is at crossroads too. The environment debate is no more restricted to the usual ‘development versus ecology’ argument, its departed into a new realm of cronyism – economic, religious and therefore political. Most rivers of our country are either dead or dying, our capital River Yamuna being almost on the top of the list. There has been a design in this destruction, and its only moving from bad to worse. ‘How to Kill A River’ is an exploration of what’s wrong in Delhi and what not to let happen in Goa.

In 2011, Vimlendu Jha was invited to speak at the UN General Assembly on youth issues in the global south. He is also a successful green entrepreneur, having set up the Green the Map, Swechha India’s fair trade initiative that produces innovative products from waste material. Additionally, he has made award-winning documentaries on environmental and youth issues that have been broadcasted by national and international news channels. His films include Disposable and Wasted, which deal with solid waste management; Jijivisha, which deals with water issues and the plight of the river Yamuna; and Tatva, which deals with climate, water and energy issues. Vimlendu’s innovative and unconventional approaches to contemporary environmental and social issues have touched millions of people worldwide. In 2007, Vimlendu was selected as one of 6 worldwide change makers by CNN International to be part of Be the Change programme, which followed his work for over a year and was viewed by more than 100 million people worldwide. Vimlendu also anchored the International Year of Volunteers 2001 initiative in India through UNV, heading the Volunteer Promotion Unit in New Delhi.